8th-conference

 

The 8th "Engaging with Vietnam - An Interdisciplinary Dialogue" Conference

 

Engaging With Vietnam through Scholarship and the Arts

(Just to clarify: You do not have to be an artist or work in the arts to participate in this year's Engaging With Vietnam Conference. As always, this is a MULTI-DISCIPLINARY conference. The keynote sessions will demonstrate how artists and musicians are asking the same questions about society as academics, while the breakout sessions will enable academics to "engage with Vietnam" in their own ways. While you do not have to do arts to participate and present at the conference, being at the conference will give you every opportunity to have a dialogue with the arts and with scholars working on scholarship related to Vietnam.)

 

Dates: 4th - 10th October, 2016

(including pre and post conference receptions, lectures, and activities)

Venue: University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu

Host: University of Hawaii at Manoa

 

Engaging with Vietnam: www.engagingwithvietnam.org

Engaging with Vietnam Conference: www.engagingwithvietnam.net

https://www.facebook.com/engagingwithvietnam

EngagingwithVietnam YouTube Channel

 

The Engaging with Vietnam conference series has always encouraged dialogues between disciplines. It is in that spirit that this year’s conference will seek to facilitate conversations between various academic disciplines and the arts.

In recent years the Vietnamese arts world - be it music, painting or performance - has been very active and dynamic in attempting to “engage with Vietnam,” in the broadest sense, in our current era of globalization and societal change. Alongside the featuring of signature scholarship from scholars in various academic disciplines, in this year’s conference we will also be highlighting in our keynote sessions the work of various artists and their engagements with Vietnamese society, culture and history as a way to build connections between the arts world and academia. We find that both of these communities ask many of the same questions, but they, for most part, remain rather disconnected. Therefore, by engaging the two in a dialogue we hope that all can work together more productively and creatively and to find more rigorous and interdisciplinary answers to their questions.

As well as dedicating to Engaging with Vietnam through Scholarship and the Arts, we are also making every attempt to engage in this event the arts community/ies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and in Hawaii more broadly. We hope such multiple engagements will enrich and stimulate scholarship and creativity in meaningful ways.

With this in mind, we would like to invite you to participate in the 8th Engaging with Vietnam conference. As usual, we look forward to receiving abstracts from you that continue to inform and challenge us with solid and innovative ideas and findings. You do not have to do arts to participate and present at the conference, but being at the conference will give you every opportunity to have a dialogue with the arts.

 

Thank you and we look forward to a stimulating conference.

 

Aloha nui,

 

On behalf of the Organizing Committee,

Phan Le Ha, College of Education (Founder, Conference Co-Chair and Co-Convener)

Liam Kelley, Department of History (Co-Founder, Conference Co-Chair and Co-Convener)

Keynote and invited speakers

Dr. Lê Thùy Linh

Le Thuy Linh, PhD (Education, Monash University, Australia) has been a lecturer at Hanoi National University of Education (HNUE), Vietnam since 1999. She is currently the head of the English department at Baxter Institute and teaching TESOL at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. She has been actively involved in English language training and teacher education through her work with various professional development projects in Vietnam and Australia over the last 18 years. Her research interests include Teacher Education and Teacher Identity, Pedagogy and Assessment in TESOL, Professionalism in ELT, and recently Vocational Training and Education (VET).

Trịnh Lê Anh

Trinh Le Anh, Department of Events Management, Faculty of Tourism Studies, University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Vietnam National University Hanoi, is also an inspiring lecturer and a well-known TV show host, MC, and event conductor. Le Anh has been engaged in different forms of the arts and performances alongside his interests and expertise in tourism and development studies, and the social and cultural issues surrounding festivals and events in Vietnam. In his capacity as MC Le Anh in numerous major events, he has had a strong public influence in the Vietnamese society.

Professor Jonathan Warren

Jonathan Warren is a Full Professor of International Studies and Co-Director of the Center for Brazilian Studies, University of Washington, Seattle. He has published extensively in the areas of critical race studies, development, art, and education. Some of his recent work includes “The Diversification of State Power: Vietnam’s Alternative Path to Budgetary Transparency, Accountability and Participation” (in Open Budgets, 2013), “After Colorblindness: Teaching Antiracism to Progressive Whites in the US” (in Teaching Race and Anti-Racism in Contemporary America, 2014), From the Bottom Up (Third World Newsreel, 2015, 61 minutes), and Cultures of Development: Vietnam, Brazil and the Unsung Vanguard of Modernity (Routledge, in press).

Professor Jonathan Warren

Jonathan Warren is a Full Professor of International Studies and Co-Director of the Center for Brazilian Studies, University of Washington, Seattle. He has published extensively in the areas of critical race studies, development, art, and education. Some of his recent work includes “The Diversification of State Power: Vietnam’s Alternative Path to Budgetary Transparency, Accountability and Participation” (in Open Budgets, 2013), “After Colorblindness: Teaching Antiracism to Progressive Whites in the US” (in Teaching Race and Anti-Racism in Contemporary America, 2014), From the Bottom Up (Third World Newsreel, 2015, 61 minutes), and Cultures of Development: Vietnam, Brazil and the Unsung Vanguard of Modernity (Routledge, in press).

Dr. Jamie Gillen

Dr. Jamie Gillen has been an assistant professor of geography at the National University of Singapore since 2011.  His primary research and teaching is focused on tourism in Southeast Asia, with a focus on Vietnam. Jamie published a short book in 2016 that summarizes his research on the intersection of entrepreneurialism and tourism in Vietnam. Vietnam is also the centerpiece of other recent publications on topics like the urban-rural binary, the various uses and symbolisms of the motorbike, and the tools used to undertake fieldwork. His current projects include collaborative studies on Asian smallholders and Asian futurities.

Prof Dr. Phan Lê Hà

Phan Le Ha (Phan is the family name), PhD, is a Full Professor in the College of Education, University of Hawai’i at Manoa, USA. Professor Phan also holds adjunct positions at universities in Vietnam and Australia. Her expertise includes language-identity-pedagogy studies, knowledge mobility and production, TESOL, and international and higher education. She is the founder of Engaging with Vietnam, which since 2009 has brought together policy makers, researchers, and professionals working in a wide range of countries and organizations to engage with Vietnam-related scholarship from inter- and multi-disciplinary perspectives and approaches. She looks forward to your helping the Initiative to blossom and sustain itself as a continuing rigorous dialogue.

Phan Le Ha's expertise, knowledge and experiences are largely informed by her work in Asia, Australia, the Middle East, and North America. She has been supervising/advising research projects at Honours, Master's and PhD levels on a wide range of topics, including identity studies, English language education in global contexts, transnational/offshore education, and the internationalisation of education more broadly.

Her publications can be found on:

https://coe.hawaii.edu/directory/?person=halephan
http://monuni.academia.edu/LeHaPhan

Professor Phan is currently developing a new interest in engaging with the arts, the media and the digital world to produce multimodal multidisciplinary scholarship and to push research and knowledge production into new directions.

A/Prof Dr. Liam C. Kelley

Dr. Liam Kelley is an Associate Professor in the History Department at the Univeristy of Hawaii at Manoa. His research and teaching focuses on mainland Southeast Asian history, and premodern Vietnamese history. Dr. Kelley is co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Vietnamese Studies. He has published a book on envoy poetry (thơ đi sứ), co-edited a book on China’s Southern frontiers, and published articles and book chapters on the invention of traditions in medieval Vietnam, the emergence of Vietnamese nationalism and spirit writing (giáng bút) in early twentieth century Vietnam. He has also completed English translations of the outer annals (ngoại kỷ) of the Đại Việt sử ký toàn thư and the Khâm định Việt sử thông giám cương mực. Dr. Kelley is currently writing a monograph on the modern search for Viet origins and developing his arts-inspired interests on knowledge production which can be found on his personal blog (leminhkhai.wordpress.com) and its associated YouTube channel.

Dr. Liam Kelley, since 2011, has been co-developing the Engaging with Vietnam initiative with Dr. Phan Le Ha.

Dr. Bao Dat

Dat Bao is a pedagogist, visual artist and song composer. He provides visual illustrations for textbooks and writes music as a hobby when life inspires. Dat lectures at Monash University and conducts research into creative pedagogy with implications in curriculum design. His recent book Understanding Silence and Reticence(Bloomsbury, 2014) reflects his view on how silence can sometimes become the most meaningful sound in the mind.

Professor Dr. Pierre Asselin

Pierre Asselin is currently Professor of History at Hawai'i Pacific University.  He will be taking up the Dwight Stanford Chair at US Foreign Relations History at San Diego State University in August 2017. His area of primary expertise is the history of American foreign relations with a focus on East and Southeast Asia and the larger Cold War context.  He is a leading authority on the Vietnam War and, specifically, the decision-making of Vietnamese communist authorities in the period 1954-75.  He speaks Vietnamese and regularly travels to Vietnam for research.  His interest in internationalism and transnationalism during the Vietnam War has taken him to various other document repositories, including the Algerian National Archives.
Asselin is the author of A Bitter Peace: Washington, Hanoi, and the Making of the Paris Agreement (University of North Carolina Press, 2002), winner of the 2003 Kenneth W. Baldridge Prize, and Hanoi’s Road to the Vietnam War, 1954-1965 (University of California Press, 2013), winner of the 2013 Arthur Goodzeit Book Award.  He recently completed his third book, Vietnam’s American War: A History (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming [January 2018]), which surveys the Vietnamese communist experience during the conflict.  Other recent and notable publications include “The Democratic Republic of Vietnam and the 1954 Geneva Conference: A Revisionist Critique” in Cold War History (2011); “Revisionism Triumphant: Hanoi’s Diplomatic Strategy in the Nixon Era” in Journal of Cold War Studies (2011); and “‘We Don’t Want a Munich’: Hanoi’s Diplomatic Strategy, 1965-1968” in Diplomatic History (2012).
Asselin is co-editor of The Cambridge History of the Vietnam War, Volume III: Endings (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming [2020]).  His latest book-project is a history of the “global Vietnam War” casting the American war in Vietnam as a global political, social, and cultural phenomenon that irrevocably changed the world and served as harbinger for myriad international and transnational causes.  In addition to relating the history of the conflict itself, the book addresses the war’s effects in the United States, Western Europe, the Communist World, and the so-called Third World.